Jim Kenney: Keep Your Campaign Promise. Bring Back Street-Sweeping in Your First Term.

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Sign our petition to tell Mayor Kenney to keep his campaign promise, and bring back street-sweeping services before the end of his first term.

Philadelphia is known nationwide as an exceptionally dirty city, and this dirt problem even has a name: Filthadelphia.

Mayor Kenney campaigned on changing this during the 2015 campaign, and restoring the street-sweeping program was a regular part of his stump speech. He even said that cleaner streets are worth the occasional hassle of alternate-side parking.

The red flags started going up right after the May primary, when Kenney started backtracking, saying he'd only bring the program back for neighborhoods willing to move their cars, and there would be some kind of opt-in or opt-out provision. 

This week we found out it's been cast aside even further, as a "Long-Term Priority" in the Zero Waste Action Plan released this week, described in the most non-committal possible language. At some undefined point in time, the administration will maybe "consider restoration of street sweeping."

That's unacceptable. Mayor Kenney needs to make restoring street-sweeping a priority in his first term.

As we've argued previously, street-sweeping should be one of Philadelphia's bedrock municipal services. Philly was actually the first city to have a street-sweeping program (thanks, Benjamin Franklin!), and now we're the only major city that doesn't have one. It's relatively cheap, costing the capital budget just $18 million in to buy the sweepers, and about $3 million in annual salaries to clean the whole city every other week. The problem isn't money—it's people who don't want to move their cars, even occasionally. 

The Mayor is already on the record saying that he wants to take the cleaner streets side of that trade-off, and now it's time for him to make good on that promise. 

Sign and share the petition, and help us send a message to Mayor Kenney that he needs to put clean streets first, and be accountable for what he promised the voters.

321 signatures

Will you sign?

Showing 277 reactions

  • Ted Zellers
    signed 2018-12-10 23:21:48 -0500
    I’m tired of getting flat tires!
  • Kara Nelson
    @BellyofFate tweeted link to this page. 2018-12-06 14:58:02 -0500
    Sign and share to tell Jim Kenney to keep his promise to clean Philly's streets http://www.phila3-0.org/street_sweeping?recruiter_id=53444
  • Kara Nelson
    signed 2018-12-06 14:57:47 -0500
    If NYC can do this, we need to step up in Philly. We don’t need more cars in Philly…we need more clean up!
  • Kyle Mattson
    signed 2018-12-04 14:56:57 -0500
  • Joseph Torres
    signed 2018-12-04 11:06:17 -0500
  • Philip Green
    signed 2018-12-03 12:14:58 -0500
    Nasty streets are demoralizing to all Philadelphians. I have a car in south philly and would gladly move it monthly if not weekly for cleaner streets.
  • Mike Ford
    signed 2018-12-03 09:37:24 -0500
  • Katherine Powers Cuomo
    signed 2018-12-02 18:02:16 -0500
  • Peter Wolanin
    signed 2018-12-02 17:10:56 -0500
  • Margaret Turcich
    signed 2018-12-02 12:02:19 -0500
    MARGARET TURCICH
  • Thomas DeLuca
    signed 2018-12-01 18:08:32 -0500
  • Patricia Moore-Martinez
    signed 2018-12-01 17:54:10 -0500
  • Mark Graham
    signed 2018-12-01 12:35:23 -0500
  • Allan Domb
    signed 2018-11-30 22:27:47 -0500
    Important quality of life issue
  • Leslie Linnebur
    signed 2018-11-30 14:03:38 -0500
  • Matthew Borda
    signed 2018-11-30 13:58:27 -0500
  • Paul Grossman
    signed 2018-11-30 13:52:43 -0500
    Paul J Grossman
  • logan welde
    signed 2018-11-30 13:50:51 -0500
    logan welde
  • Owen Sindler
    signed 2018-11-30 13:43:22 -0500
    Clean sheets please.
  • David Colman
    signed 2018-11-30 13:37:44 -0500
  • Yusi Liu
    @yusi44liu tweeted link to this page. 2018-11-19 23:42:16 -0500
    Sign and share to tell Jim Kenney to keep his promise to clean Philly's streets http://www.phila3-0.org/street_sweeping?recruiter_id=53278
  • Yusi Liu
    signed 2018-11-19 23:41:43 -0500
  • jack hua
    signed 2018-11-12 10:07:25 -0500
    Streets are fitlhy, Philadelphia will not thrive with dirty streets. It is time for Philadelphia to be recognized as a Gem instead of trash.
  • Ryan Kelly
    @rybread732 tweeted link to this page. 2018-10-23 14:16:30 -0400
    Sign and share to tell Jim Kenney to keep his promise to clean Philly's streets http://www.phila3-0.org/street_sweeping?recruiter_id=53030
  • Ryan Kelly
    signed 2018-10-23 14:15:50 -0400
    Our streets are dirty!
  • Daniel DeCarlo
    signed 2018-10-19 20:29:18 -0400
    This is absolutely necessary and will help to make the city more attractive to potential buyers and families who want invest in the city. Cleaner streets = higher property values = more tax revenue for additional municipal services and infrastructure spending.
  • Thomas Saldutti
    signed 2018-09-20 13:05:56 -0400
    Reading other articles, it sounds like the only solution is a “culture shift” in which people would stop using so many disposable products. If this was true, how come other American cities don’t have such a noticble litter problem? It’s hard to believe that the Philly is the only city with a throwaway culture. If the city starts street sweeping and people see cleaner streets, maybe they will feel more motivated to keep their neighborhood clean. As for the car debate, people don’t seem to have any problem moving their car for street repaving. I think we could at least implement bi-weekly street sweeping and it would still make a huge difference without aggravating parking problems.
  • Jeremy Olsen
    signed 2018-09-20 08:47:51 -0400
    Sanitation removal workers need to be more careful. City needs to be more strict about how trash is to be put out. Recycling seems like a bad joke
  • Joan McGee
    signed 2018-09-19 21:12:38 -0400
  • Richard Kinney
    signed 2018-09-19 19:49:54 -0400
    I am outraged and embarrassed at both the filthy state of Philadelphia and Mayor Kenney’s apparent unwillingness to address this fundamental aspect of city services. Shame is too soft a term to direct at the Mayor and City Council for their negligence.